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You have a right to payment as an employee

As an employee who has been with your company for over a decade, you expect to receive pay on time and accurately. If you receive a check that isn't the right amount or don't receive a paycheck on time, it's important to speak up immediately.

There are regulations in place to prevent employers from cheating their employees out of money. For instance, requirements normally state how frequently employees receive payments from employers. If an employer doesn't provide a timely payment, then the employee has a right to complain and seek compensation.

What should you do if you don't receive a paycheck?

The first step is always to talk to your employer. Find out what the problem is. Did the employer make a mistake when submitting documents to process with the bank? Did the employer decide not to pay you for certain hours? Find out the problem up front, so you know what to expect.

Employers must pay at least minimum wage for all hours worked, as ordered by the U.S. Department of Labor.

What should I do if I didn't receive the full paycheck?

If you see a few missing hours on your paycheck, first double check to make sure those hours were meant to be on this paycheck and not the next one. Knowing the paycheck's cut-off date helps with this. If there was a legitimate mistake, your employer may correct it by submitting the payment to you or may agree to add the payment onto your next paycheck.

If the employer argues the hours you worked, you should prepare a timesheet showing when you were at work and the hours worked for his or her records.

What happens if an employer won't pay on time or accurately?

The good news is that federal laws protect employees against unfair wage discrimination and discrepancies. You should ask your employer to explain his or her actions and then, if that doesn't resolve the issue, move on to consider filing a lawsuit against him or her.

Many cases head to small-claims court, but the threat of a court case may encourage your employer to pay you what is owed. Keep in mind that the state or federal government could penalize employers who do not follow through with obligations to employees, making sure they're held accountable. Reporting your employer may help you and others get the money you deserve for your hard work.

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201 N. Calle Cesar Chavez
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Santa Barbara, CA 93103

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